Gut-Boosting Pancake Recipes

National Pancake day has arrived, and we wanted to share our top 3 recipes for making your pancakes gut-boosting! 

Pancakes don’t have to be unhealthy or a naughty treat - you can make them a nutritious and filling meal, and these recipes can show you how. We have included some of the health benefits of each recipe; read on to find out!

Banana Oat Pancakes with Prebiotic Toppings

Ingredients:

  • 2 ripe bananas 
  • 2 eggs
  • Ground cinnamon
  • 80g of rolled oats
  • Maple syrup
  • Fruit of your choice (we recommend strawberries, raspberries and kiwi)

Method:

For this recipe, a blender is best. If you don’t have access to a blender, you can just whisk the ingredients by hand!

Blend together the bananas, eggs, cinnamon and rolled oats. Heat a pan with oil or butter, and wait until hot. Add the mixture to the pan; either in small circles or fill the pan depending on the size you want your pancakes to be! 

Once brown on one side, flip pancakes. A good indication of it being ready to flip is that it starts to dry on the top. Cook until both sides are golden/browning (depending on personal preference) and transfer to a plate.

Whilst it’s cooking, you can cut up your fruit. We recommend strawberries, raspberries and kiwi for a delicious taste and many nutritional benefits! Add your fruit to the pancakes once they are on the plate and drizzle with maple syrup.

Health benefits:

Strawberries are one of the best sources of vitamin C; just one serving contains more vitamin C than an orange; notorious for its vitamin C content. They contain magnesium and potassium, and are in the top 20 antioxidant fruits!1

Raspberries are also a fantastic source of dietary fibre and vitamin C, as well as manganese, B vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids and potassium.2 Raspberries are also considered one of the highest protein fruits. 

Kiwis are high in protein, as well as fibre, potassium, vitamin C and vitamin K.3 Kiwis are particularly good for digestion due to containing Actazin - a superhero for the gut. Actazin can reduce inflammation, helping the gut to function properly.4

Don’t be fooled by maple syrup’s sweet taste - it can actually be good for the gut!

Maple syrup contains inulin, which is a complex carbohydrate. It is a dietary fibre, which is prebiotic; the best food for good bacteria in the gut.5

Greek Yoghurt-infused pancakes with Nut topping

Ingredients:

  • 128g whole-wheat flour
  • 128g all-purpose flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 250ml cups milk
  • 2 eggs
  • vanilla extract
  • 64g 2% greek yoghurt (unsweetened) plus some for topping
  • Mixed nuts for topping

Method:

Start by mixing all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and make a well in the middle. In a separate bowl, mix the wet ingredients together excluding the yoghurt. Pour the wet ingredients into the well and combine. Once combined, add the yoghurt. 

Heat up some oil or butter in a frying pan. Once hot, pour in the mixture to create your desired size pancake. Once it begins to dry on the top, flip your pancake! Cook until done on both sides and then transfer to a plate.

Add a dollop of your greek yoghurt on the top of your pancakes and then take some mixed nuts and sprinkle them on top. 

Health benefits: 

Mixed nuts are a highly nutritious food - containing protein, fibre, vitamin E, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, manganese and selenium.6 Adding a sprinkle on top of your pancakes can keep you full for longer and add a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals into your diet. 

Greek yoghurt is a probiotic food - meaning it adds new species of good bacteria to the gut microbiome and helps to keep it balanced and healthy. Greek yoghurt also contains calcium, protein, iodine and vitamin B12.7

Final Thoughts

Not only are these recipes delicious, but they are super easy to make, and nutritious! Let us know if you try out either of these recipes - we'd love to see your pictures!

References → 1

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